Win a MELVILLE DVD box set

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Value: £50

Ends December 19, 2017.

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To celebrate the release of a brand-new Blu-Ray boxset of six key films from one of France’s most celebrated and truly original filmmakers, Jean-Pierre Melville, STUDIOCANAL are offering two lucky winners the chance to win a copy of the MELVILLE boxset which is released on December 11.

Featuring several brand-new 4k restorations and exclusive new extras, MELVILLE, THE ESSENTIAL COLLECTION will be available to own on Blu-Ray December 11. A number of the titles featured in the collection; Le Doulos, Bob Le Flambeur, Léon Morin, Prêtre, L’Armée Des Ombres and Le Cercle Rouge, will also be available to own individually on a later date (TBC).

Often regarded as the godfather of the Nouvelle Vague, the films in MELVILLETHE ESSENTIAL COLLECTION are all examples of the daring and innovative filmmaking that would see the controversial director influence many artists and filmmakers even now, from Godard to Tarantino to Johnnie To.

Though remembered now primarily for his intense, spare 1960s gangster films, French filmmaker Jean-Pierre Melville had a startlingly varied career, encompassing wartime dramas, psychosexual character studies, and a collaboration with Jean Cocteau.
Jean-Pierre Grumbach (he would eventually change his name to Melville to honor the American author of Moby Dick), though a lover of classical studio directors (William Wyler and John Huston among them), worked mostly independently, even building his own studio.
It was this fierce do-it-yourself attitude, and such startling, uncompromising films as Les Enfants Terribles and Bob le Flambeur, that appealed to the filmmakers of the French New Wave, who adopted Melville as a godfather of sorts (Godard even famously gave him a cameo in Breathless).

During the New Wave, however, Melville went his own way, making highly idiosyncratic crime films—classically mounted if daringly existential—that were beholden to no trend, including Le Doulos, Le Deuxième Soufflé, and Le Samouraï. His most personal movie was L’Armée des Ombres, which, though misunderstood upon its initial French release in 1969, is now widely considered a masterpiece. Melville died of a heart attack in 1973 at the age of fifty-five.

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